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Will you share your voice with us?

Hey Feminists,

It’s time to start thinking about art and performance pieces for our annual art show, Jack and Jill: The Other Side of the Hill.  If you are an artist, or if you feel like creating something special for this show, we’d love for you to share with us.  Pieces are due no later than Sunday, March 27th in order to prepare for our show on Thursday, March 31st.

The show will have art pieces on display while various performances take place.  So, we are looking for a mix of mediums: paintings, photos, sculpture, mixed media, poetry, spoken word, dance, music, etc. etc.

Best,

Carolyn

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blog make-over and upcoming events

Hello all,

I’m in the process of sprucing up our blog! I’ve added an Upcoming Events tab, which I will update accordingly. (And maybe figure out a way to make it look better…any thoughts?)

We are working very hard on the upcoming February events, many of which are focused on the Riot Grrl movement and Eating Disorder Awareness Week. Check them out!

Also, if you would like to post a blog entry on any topic that you’re interested in, please let us know. We’d love to have you.

Best,

Carolyn

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Mass Meeting!

Be sure to come to our mass meeting tonight (Monday Sept 14) at 7pm in the Dana Commons (Dana is the building south of the Chem building). Hope to see you there!

Also, as a bonus: the first decision based on the Lilly Ledbetter Act. Yay!

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Response to nytimes “The Women’s Crusade”

Normally, I get very excited when other people get excited about women’s rights. In this case though, I am just lukewarm. This Sunday’s New York Times Magazine spotlights women’s issues. NYT columnist Nick Kristof co-authored the cover article “The Women’s Crusade“. He does not make any illuminating remarks in the sense that the facts and arguments he presents have long been better articulated by feminist scholars and activists. But Kristof is a man and a longtime columnist of the reputable Nytimes automatically rendering him to the masses as more brilliant, credible, objective and thus worth listening to than any wacko feminist. I say that matter-of-factly with no bitterness, just awareness of the way things are. After all, if one has more credibility or privilege–earned or unearned–one would be dum dum not to use it. And that is what Kristof has been doing as a nytimes columnist, using his white man privileges to bring attention to women’s issues and global poverty. But not all attention is good. That uninvited slap on the ass I got last time I went clubbing? Bad attention. Unlike the sleaze I encountered at the club, I trust that Kristof has good intentions. However, the arguments and tone he and co-author Sheryl WuDunn uses to forward women’s rights carry some assumptions that simultaneously undermine women’s rights and dignity.

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Mistrust

Melissa McEwan manages to describe every day in my life in a blog entry at Shakesville. Basically, discussing the way we feminist are constantly having to explain/defend/assert ourselves, even to those people who we love and claim to care about us. We have to make the decision: should we (as she puts it) “Swallow shit, or ruin the entire afternoon?”

I’m so incredibly tempted to a very specific jackass who is every so fond of using the “devil’s advocate” I’m-only-trying-to-find-weaknesses-in-your-argument line. But he would not get it and I would have to waste my time arguing with him again.

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More on Motherhood

Following up: Today, another article on motherhood in the NYT, specifically the high mortality rate for mothers, specifically discussing Tanzania.

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The Danger of Motherhood

Great op-ed in the New York Times on motherhood in West Africa, and the risks of childbirth. I specifically like that Kristof acknowledges the sexism in the world’s response (or rather, lack thereof):

It’s pretty clear that if men were dying at these rates, the United Nations Security Council would be holding urgent consultations, and a country such as this would appoint a minister of paternal mortality. Yet half-a-million women die annually from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth without attracting much interest because the victims are typically among the most voiceless people in the world: impoverished, rural, uneducated and female.

Anyway, it’s a good read, and I think something the F-word should address in the fall? Maybe we can do some kind of fundraiser drive, or awareness campaign? Kristof makes some suggestions on groups that address these issues in his blog, which is also a good read.

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